keyboards contacts restoration

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keyboards contacts restoration

silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:

https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf

But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?

--
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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Nick Vivid
I just use a circuit writer pen on my c64 keyboard contacts and it works great.

On Thu, Oct 11, 2018, 12:30 PM <[hidden email]> wrote:
I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:

https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf

But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?

--
SD! - http://e4aws.silverdr.com/


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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Paul Schmidt
In reply to this post by silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
I have always just used isopropyl alcohol on Q-tips and gently rubbed the surfaces of the conductive rubber pads, and always had excellent results. I don't think that the conductive rubber loses its conductivity, but rather that the contacting surface of the rubber picks up dirt and pollutants and forms a non-conductive film that the alcohol (and very mild abrasion of the cotton Q-tip) removes.


Paul Schmidt
[hidden email]


-----Original Message-----

>From: [hidden email]
>Sent: Oct 11, 2018 11:29 AM
>To: [hidden email]
>Subject: keyboards contacts restoration
>
>I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>
>https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>
>But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?
>
>--
>SD! - http://e4aws.silverdr.com/
>
>

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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Gerrit Heitsch
In reply to this post by silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
On 10/11/2018 06:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>
> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>
> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?

There are people who suggest a pencil, grade 9B, meaning the softest one.

You could also try 'Graphit 33' from Kontakt Chemie.

But first, I'd try to clean the contacts and see if that helps.


That reminds me... I still have an A1200 keyboard that needs some
refreshing on a few keys.

  Gerrit


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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

geneb
On Thu, 11 Oct 2018, Gerrit Heitsch wrote:

> On 10/11/2018 06:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive
>> rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special
>> chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original
>> conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>>
>> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>>
>> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to
>> work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?
>
> There are people who suggest a pencil, grade 9B, meaning the softest one.
>
> You could also try 'Graphit 33' from Kontakt Chemie.
>
> But first, I'd try to clean the contacts and see if that helps.
>

There was a recent restoration video on YouTube the other day where the
the restorer used 1500 grit sandpaper to lightly sand the contacts on the
domes.  He got 100% success out of it.
g.

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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

hegedusis
In reply to this post by Gerrit Heitsch
I like to use the Graphit 33. It has fixed my whole Plus4 keyboard.

I have also purchased an A1200 keyboard foil which had the caps lock key
pad slightly offset and I have used the Graphite to enlarge those pads.
It works perfectly.

You can spray the paint to a cap and use a brush to paint the pads with it.

Istvan



On 2018.10.11. 19:10, Gerrit Heitsch wrote:

> On 10/11/2018 06:29 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the
>> conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are
>> special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the
>> original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>>
>> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>>
>> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything
>> tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both
>> arm and leg?
>
> There are people who suggest a pencil, grade 9B, meaning the softest one.
>
> You could also try 'Graphit 33' from Kontakt Chemie.
>
> But first, I'd try to clean the contacts and see if that helps.
>
>
> That reminds me... I still have an A1200 keyboard that needs some
> refreshing on a few keys.
>
>  Gerrit
>


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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Rob Clarke
In reply to this post by silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
I've only had C116 keyboards that could not be bought back to life with
thorough cleaning, and when that happened I used this: http://keypadfix.com/

Preparation is everything. Clean thoroughly, and if necessary
de-glaze/roughen, the contacts before you apply it.

Rob

  On 11/10/2018 18:29, [hidden email] wrote:
> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>
> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>
> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?
>


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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Didier Derny
to repair a C116 keyboard I used  graphit 33 + qtip

graphit 33 sprayed on a sheet of paper then the graphit applied with the
q-tip


still works but I'm not using it intensively



On 10/11/2018 10:20 PM, Rob Clarke wrote:

> I've only had C116 keyboards that could not be bought back to life
> with thorough cleaning, and when that happened I used this:
> http://keypadfix.com/
>
> Preparation is everything. Clean thoroughly, and if necessary
> de-glaze/roughen, the contacts before you apply it.
>
> Rob
>
>  On 11/10/2018 18:29, [hidden email] wrote:
>> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the
>> conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that there are
>> special chemicals/formulations, which are able to restore the
>> original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:
>>
>> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf
>>
>> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality. Anything
>> tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both
>> arm and leg?
>>
>
>

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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Julian Perry
In reply to this post by silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
Re: keyboards contacts restoration Hello Silverdr,

Friday, October 12, 2018, 3:29:57 AM, you wrote:

> I vaguely recall a discussion about repairing/renovating the
> conductive rubber keyboard elements and the conclusion that
> there are special chemicals/formulations, which are able to
> restore the original conductivity. But what would those be? There is this thing:

> https://www.chemtronics.com/content/msds/Cw2605tds.pdf

> But the price tag seems to be out of touch with reality.
> Anything tested to work well with PET/VIC/C64 keyboards that doesn't cost both arm and leg?


I've found that in the first instance a good clean of both contacts and gold-plated board pads with isopropyl usually works.
Failing that a very light sanding with fine sandpaper of an emery board, just to remove the "glazing" of the rubber, followed with a clan with isopropyl has always worked for me.

[hidden email]
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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
In reply to this post by silverdr@wfmh.org.pl
Thanks for all the responses. I have now a few things to try, starting probably with warm ultrasonic bath for the keys and cleaning the PCB pads. I take those conductive key elements are nowhere to source these days, are they?

--
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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Sam Laur-3
[hidden email] wrote:
> Thanks for all the responses. I have now a few things to try, starting probably with warm ultrasonic bath for the keys and cleaning the PCB pads. I take those conductive key elements are nowhere to source these days, are they?
>

Of course, there are remote control keypad repair kits available,
that have just the black conductive pads and then a tube of suitable
glue included. I've found them in a local electronics shop, but eBay
has several different kits on offer. Just choose one that has the
correct size pads included, and enough of them. For example, one
with 500 pcs. 4mm pads (can't remember what the correct size is) :
https://www.ebay.com/itm/222305539192

(Note that I haven't tested this exact kit, only the one I found at
the local shop, so your mileage may vary, caveat emptor, all usual
warnings apply, etc.)



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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

silverdr@wfmh.org.pl

> On 2018-10-12, at 13:32, Sam Laur <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> [hidden email] wrote:
>> Thanks for all the responses. I have now a few things to try, starting probably with warm ultrasonic bath for the keys and cleaning the PCB pads. I take those conductive key elements are nowhere to source these days, are they?
>
> Of course, there are remote control keypad repair kits available,

No, I know those are available but those are different than what's inside the proper keyboards (as opposed to rubber keypads). Rather than round pads, there are "strips" spanning across the lower end of the plastic "rod" that's pushed down on keystrokes. I'd be interested in buying either the conductive "strips" or the whole element (rod with strip). They might possibly be still used in some modern keyboards.

--
SD! - http://e4aws.silverdr.com/


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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

Sam Laur-3
[hidden email] wrote:
>> On 2018-10-12, at 13:32, Sam Laur <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> [hidden email] wrote:
>>> Thanks for all the responses. I have now a few things to try, starting probably with warm ultrasonic bath for the keys and cleaning the PCB pads. I take those conductive key elements are nowhere to source these days, are they?
>> Of course, there are remote control keypad repair kits available,
>
> No, I know those are available but those are different than what's inside the proper keyboards (as opposed to rubber keypads). Rather than round pads, there are "strips" spanning across the lower end of the plastic "rod" that's pushed down on keystrokes. I'd be interested in buying either the conductive "strips" or the whole element (rod with strip). They might possibly be still used in some modern keyboards.
>

Oh, okay, that type. The only one I've had to clean/fix thus far is
referred to by some page as "Type 2" and that has round contacts...
http://blog.retroleum.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/0001_type2.jpg
But yeah, the other contacts can be a bit more difficult to find.
Unless you get big round pads and cut them to size, or something.

That site sells keyboard parts, but they're all salvaged, so the
condition is "tested working" but naturally not like new.
https://www.retroleum.co.uk/c64-keyboard

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Re: keyboards contacts restoration

traymond160
Would this be something that could build up the contact flush again to make a better contact.
I remember something about this years ago and would need to find a link to see if this product is still available.

Try the key contact usually those wear out too.

I surmise you're referring to the keyboard PCB contacts?

Terry Raymond

On Fri, Oct 12, 2018, 6:25 AM Sam Laur <[hidden email]> wrote:
[hidden email] wrote:
>> On 2018-10-12, at 13:32, Sam Laur <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> [hidden email] wrote:
>>> Thanks for all the responses. I have now a few things to try, starting probably with warm ultrasonic bath for the keys and cleaning the PCB pads. I take those conductive key elements are nowhere to source these days, are they?
>> Of course, there are remote control keypad repair kits available,
>
> No, I know those are available but those are different than what's inside the proper keyboards (as opposed to rubber keypads). Rather than round pads, there are "strips" spanning across the lower end of the plastic "rod" that's pushed down on keystrokes. I'd be interested in buying either the conductive "strips" or the whole element (rod with strip). They might possibly be still used in some modern keyboards.
>

Oh, okay, that type. The only one I've had to clean/fix thus far is
referred to by some page as "Type 2" and that has round contacts...
http://blog.retroleum.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/0001_type2.jpg
But yeah, the other contacts can be a bit more difficult to find.
Unless you get big round pads and cut them to size, or something.

That site sells keyboard parts, but they're all salvaged, so the
condition is "tested working" but naturally not like new.
https://www.retroleum.co.uk/c64-keyboard